Radio active dating isotop

Based on our study of meteorites and rocks from the Moon, as well as modeling the formation of planets, it is believed (pretty much well-established) that all of the objects in the Solar System formed very quickly about 4.56 billion years ago.

When we age date a planet, we are actually just dating the age of the surface, not the whole planet.

However, rocks and other objects in nature do not give off such obvious clues about how long they have been around.

So, we rely on radiometric dating to calculate their ages.

Free 5-day trial Radiometric dating is used to estimate the age of rocks and other objects based on the fixed decay rate of radioactive isotopes.

The majority of the time fossils are dated using relative dating techniques.

The Wheeler Formation has been previously dated to approximately 507 million year old, so we know the trilobite is also about 507 million years old.

But, how can we determine how old a rock formation is, if it hasn’t previously been dated?

These are the surfaces that we can get absolute ages for.

For the others, one can only use relative age dating (such as counting craters) in order to estimate the age of the surface and the history of the surface.

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